Personally Speaking

Personally Speaking Book Covers and dates

Discover the Stories Behind the Books Through 2017-2018
“Personally Speaking” Published Author Series

As has been the case in our seven previous seasons, Personally Speaking in 2017-2018 will take you on often unexpected, sometimes uncomfortable, but always interesting journeys that range from the role of food in shaping culture to the role of slaves in the abolition movement and from the influence of Asheville’s Thomas Wolfe to defining genocide in 2017.

Four UNC Charlotte scholar/researchers will lead conversations about books they have written and how they came to write them during this 8th year of the annual series presented UNC Charlotte’s College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, J. Murrey Atkins Library and UNC Charlotte Center City.

The events are open to the public without charge, but registration is requested. To register for any of the talks, please RSVP here.

The 2017-2018 Personally Speaking conversations are

  • Ashli Quesinberry Stokes: Consuming Identity -- The Role of Food in Redefining the South (University Press of Mississippi) 
    6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, UNC Charlotte Center City 
     
  • Paula Gallant Eckard: Thomas Wolfe and Lost Children in Southern Literature  (University of Tennessee Press) 
    6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, UNC Charlotte Center City   
     
  • Christopher Cameron: To Plead Our Own Cause African Americans in Massachusetts and the Making of the Antislavery Movement: (The Kent State University Press) 
    6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, UNC Charlotte Center City
     
  • John Cox, To Kill A People: Genocide in the Twentieth Century  (Oxford University Press) 
    6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Mar. 20, 2018, UNC Charlotte Center City

“We offer this series to engage the community in conversations about relevant topics considered in books written by our faculty,” said Nancy A. Gutierrez, dean of the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. “Not only is this a way for us to connect with the community, but it also is a way to share knowledge and spark discussion.”
 

Each conversation will begin at 6:30 p.m. at UNC Charlotte Center City, 320 E. Ninth Street (Charlotte 28202) and will be followed by a reception and book signing. The series is open to the public without charge, but registration is required. Complimentary parking will be available, and specific parking information will be emailed to those who register. 
 
Register Now
 

Personally Speaking is only one of the intellectual engagement opportunities we offer our community. Together, we can bring these experiences to Charlotte well into the future. How?

People at a tableBecome a Partner

Thank you for supporting Personally Speaking. If you are interested in becoming a philanthropic partner with naming opportunities by hosting an author's conversation, email us or call 704-687-0085.

Tell us how you think we can make our community conversations better.

Fill out an evaluation form after the event; email Susan Jetton, or call 704-687-1429.

Continue to attend events, and invite others to join you.

For upcoming events visit College Engagement, or call 704-687-0085.

Make a gift

It’s easy to do. Email Caitlin Mauk or call 704-687-0085.

Or go online to giving.uncc.edu

  • Under Gift Amount and Designations, select One or more colleges, schools or units

  • In the pop up box, scroll down to find College of Liberal Arts & Sciences.

  • Select College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Fund and then Continue to complete the form.

Again, we thank you for the many ways you support UNC Charlotte.

More About the Series

Consuming Identity: The Role of Food in Redefining the South (University Press of Mississippi, 2016) by Ashli Quesinberry Stokes.

Southerners love to talk food, quickly revealing likes and dislikes, regional preferences, and their own delicious stories. Consuming Identity focuses on the role food plays in building identities -- accounting for the messages food sends about who we are, how we see ourselves, and how we see others.

Thomas Wolfe and Lost Children in Southern Literature (University of Tennessee Press, 2016) by Paula Gallant Eckard

First published in 1937, Thomas Wolfe’s The Lost Boy gives name to the “lost children” theme that has permeated much of Southern literature. In Thomas Wolfe and Lost Children in Southern Literature, his novel is a starting point for Eckard to trace thematic connections among contemporary Southern novels.

To Plead Our Own Cause: African Americans in Massachusetts and the Making of the Antislavery Movement (Kent State University Press, 2014) by Christopher Cameron

The antislavery movement entered an important new phase when William Lloyd Garrison began publishing the Liberator in 1831. Cameron explores the significant contributions of African Americans in Massachusetts to both local and nationwide antislavery activity before 1831 and demonstrates that their efforts represent the beginning of organized abolitionist activity in America.

To Kill A People: Genocide in the Twentieth Century (Oxford University Press, 2016) by John Cox

To Kill a People contributes to two key debates within genocide studies: How to define "genocide" in relation to other mass atrocities, and how to detect and analyze the social, historical and cultural forces that produce genocidal violence.